Monday, April 25, 2011

Secure Communities NOT Secure - Rounding Up NON-Criminal Immigrants

latimes.com/news/local/la-me-secure-communities-20110425,0,1739725.story
Reporting from San Francisco and Los Angeles



latimes.com

Noncriminals swept up in federal deportation program

Secure Communities, a federal program launched in 2008 with the stated goal of identifying and deporting more illegal immigrants 'convicted of serious crimes,' has netted many noncriminals or those who committed misdemeanors.

By Lee Romney and Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
April 25, 2011




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1 comment:

Vicente Duque said...

Arizona Republic Editorial : "SB 1070 has been a costly failure", "Colossal mistake", "A big, expensive con. It brought us boycotts, lost business, a sullied reputation, another court battle and a betrayal of Arizona's heritage"


Slowly, gradually, unhurriedly, leisurely, in a retarded tempo, People are discovering that SB 1070 harms Arizona.




The Arizona Republic
Editorial
SB 1070 has been a costly failure
April 23, 2011


http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/opinions/articles/2011/04/23/20110423sat1-23.html


Some excerpts :

Illegal immigration is a national problem this state law could not begin to address. SB 1070 was so clearly an intrusion into federal jurisdiction that key provisions were halted by federal District Court Judge Susan Bolton before they took effect. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld that injunction, with noted conservative Judge John Noonan agreeing that provisions of SB 1070 are unconstitutional.

More legal battles lie ahead. They will sap state resources and keep Arizona in an unflattering spotlight.

Arizona's sense of unity also took a beating because of SB 1070.

Latinos make up nearly a third of the state's population. They are part of Arizona's heritage and its future. But SB 1070 made even third-generation Arizona Latinos feel like targets for enhanced law-enforcement scrutiny.

The law created an atmosphere so ugly that Republican state Sen. Lori Klein felt justified in reading a letter full of anti-Latino slurs on the floor of the Senate.

This is where SB 1070 brought us.

Sixty executives from major state business interests successfully called on lawmakers to reject a new round of immigration bills this year.

This is where the horrible experience of SB 1070 should take us. Arizonans have to continue to speak out against the SB 1070 approach.

Lessons are being learned elsewhere.

The wave of copycat bills in other states has largely fizzled - even in Kansas, where SB 1070 architect Kris Kobach is secretary of state. He couldn't sell his state this poison.

Meanwhile, Utah took a look at what Arizona did and crafted a comprehensive approach that includes a state guest-worker program. It acknowledges the complexity of illegal immigration and makes a humane commitment to family values and children. Arizona considered - and rejected - a similar approach several years ago.

Instead, the state bought into a false promise that remains a colossal mistake a year later.
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